Things to Add to Tea

Things to Add to Tea
Who doesn’t love a little something extra? A little extra flavor. A little extra energy. A little extra fun! Tea, while delightful on its own, often benefits from a little extra something to take it that extra mile. There are tons of wonderful things to add to tea to provide that little something extra you long for.
A glass teapot full of tea sits on a wooden table surrounded by lemons, rose petals, rosemary, and lavender. The overlay text reads: things to add to tea.

Things to Add for Flavor


Sometimes you just want a little extra sweetness. In that case, sugar and honey are the classic options. A little dusting of sweetness can transform your cuppa from bitter to better in less time than it takes to sing “Spoonful of Sugar.” You can even kick it up a notch with infused sugar and infused honey, you professional tea genius, you.
If you’re looking to add sweetness without adding too much sugar, then maple syrup, agave syrup, molasses, and fresh fruit or fruit juice are all great options that can add depth and complexity to your blend of choice. Just remember that not all flavors are created equal; what you put in black tea will often differ from what you put in green tea. The drizzle of molasses that brings boldness and gravitas to your vanilla crème brulèe black tea is probably not the taste sensation you want in your passionfruit elderflower green tea, which is likely better suited to a touch of honey or spritz of lemon juice.
Milk, like sugar, is another classic add-in that can alter the flavor of your tea. There are so many varieties of milk to play with these days, depending on your dietary needs and preferences. Nut milk, soy milk, coconut milk, hemp milk... and of course the traditional cow milk, ranging from skim to whole. You could even go big and find a goat to milk. It’s your flavor journey; each style of milk will bring its own nuance to your blend. You may enjoy the richness of coconut milk in your Full Moon Chai, the earthy grounding of almond milk in your Spice of Life black tea, or the indulgent creaminess of whole milk in your Brunch in Paris black tea blend. No matter what kind you decide to splash into your teacup, milk that milk for all it’s worth.
A glass teacup full of tea sits on a wooden table alongside three lemons and a knob of ginger.

Things to Add for Health


Sometimes you want a little extra pep in your step. A little more wind in your sails. A little freedom from the pounding in your head or the twinges in your stomach. For that, I will say that some people find tea to be an excellent aide, but please remember that it is not a substitute for medicine, and this article is not a substitute for medical advice from a healthcare professional.
That being said, tea is beloved by many as a cure for what ails them. (“Cure,” of course, being a relative term). From headaches to anxious nerves, from fighting cold season to surviving finals week, to the beating winter blues , tea lovers everywhere turn to their daily cuppa for a little extra support when their body needs it. Tea can be also a lovely pick-me-up when you want to boost productivity. (I may or may not be drinking some right now to help me write this article.) The things we add to our tea may help reinforce the natural goodness that tea has to offer.
If you’re looking to supercharge the health benefits swirling around in your mug, turn to the wonders of the natural world. Ginger, lemon, turmeric, lavender, cinnamon – most any herb, spice, or fruit is a possible option. If you can find it in nature, there’s a good chance it has a potential positive to offer your body. (Important disclaimer: You have to be able to find it in nature and ALSO on the shelves of your grocery store. Please do not go foraging in your backyard and then tell the ER doctor that I told you it was okay. I didn’t!!)
Many of the aforementioned ingredients may already be featured in your favorite blends. Ginger, for instance, is prominent in both the Coconut Ginger Soother Herbal Blend with warming cinnamon as well as the Rejuvenation Blend Herbal Tea, with invigorating lemon. It’s also the only ingredient in the aptly named “Just Ginger” Herbal Blend.
Whether it’s ginger for an upset stomach, lavender for frazzled nerves, lemon for a jolt of vitamin C, or cinnamon or turmeric for fighting inflammation, there are always things to add to tea that can provide you that little extra comfort you need.
A glass teacup full of tea and a package of Plum Deluxe lavender flowers sit on a wooden table surrounded by rose petals.

Things to Add for Fun


Sometimes, you just want to have fun! No regrets, no strings, no limitations, just fun! And tea, my friends, is fun.
For our tea friends twenty-one and over, adding a little booze to your beverage can also be fun! There are so many ways to incorporate alcohol into your tea (and vice versa), from the classic hot toddy to the unexpected and delicious green tea shot. (Both of which arguably have health benefits – bonus!)
You can have tea mimosas, tea sangria, tea mint cocktails... the sky’s the limit. Invent your own tea-themed cocktail and share it with us on social media! We’d love to see what creations and libations you concoct.
If you want to add a little extra zazz in your tea but don’t want to hit the hooch in order to do it, we’ve got you covered. Try a tea spritzer or a simple, refreshing blend of tea and orange juice for an all-age appropriate “faux-mosa.” You can also play around with fancy ice cubes for an extra special touch of elegance and pop of flavor.
When considering things to add to tea, don’t forget about things to add alongside your tea: Tea snacks! And in the world of what to eat with tea, there is a veritable cornucopia of options. You’ve got tea sandwiches, scones, cookies, and a never-ending parade of sweet treats, not to mention all the themed tea parties you can throw. Food and friends and tea! Is there anything more fun than that?
A glass teapot full of tea sits on a wooden table surrounded by lemons, rose petals, rosemary, and lavender.
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