The Benefits of Elderflower Tea

The Benefits of Elderflower Tea
In late spring to early summer, the elder tree can be found blooming in the northern hemisphere and filling the air with its heady scent. If left untouched, the flowers will become the coveted elderberries well known for their immune-boosting abilities, but the flowers themselves have their own underappreciated herbal properties and delicious uses.
So, what are some of the benefits of elderflower tea?
Elderflowers have found their way into lots of teas and desserts, but there's more to this pretty flower. Learn more about the benefits of elderflower tea.

The Benefits of Elderflower Tea


There are several benefits of elderflower tea, making this herb helpful in any home apothecary.
Elderflower is a powerhouse of beneficial uses, with antiseptic, antiviral, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Herbalists have used elderflower for centuries to help aid symptoms of colds, flu, sinus infections, and upper respiratory infections. It is thought to be helpful for cooling down a fever, increasing circulation, and boosting the immune system with vitamin C and antioxidants.
It also has slight diuretic and laxative properties that can be useful in the right situation. Topically, elderflower is thought to help with aching joints due to its anti-inflammatory properties.
If you want to try harvesting your own elderflower from the tree, all leaves, sticks, and roots should be avoided as they are toxic. Also, the berries need to be cooked prior to ingesting. Personally, I have always purchased dried elderflower.
Plum Deluxe carries elderflower in their "just" collection of single-ingredient herbs, along with ginger, elderberry, hibiscus, and rosehips.
Elderflower on its own tastes floral without being perfumey, a little bit sweet, with an earthy, green base. Elderflower is an herb, so while you won’t get any tannins if you over-steep, the flower may still become bitter.
It’s best to steep one teaspoon of tea per eight ounces of boiling water for four to six minutes. Honey makes a great sweetener for elderflower tea if you prefer your tea sweetened. You could also try Plum Deluxe’s honey dust which blends honey crystals and cane sugar.
Plum Deluxe also carries several blends including elderflower.
Royal Wedding is a black lemon and elderflower tea that is inspired by the lemon elderflower cake from the Royal Wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry. Abundance Blend is a green tea option, combining passion fruit and elderflower for a light and sweet combination. If you like herbals, Slowly Unwind is a fruity take on elderflower, and Evening in the Garden combines lemon, elderflower, and rose for a lovely, soothing cup.
All of these teas carry the taste and benefits of elderflower tea.
A bag of "Just Elderflowers" sits next to a cup of elderflower tea and a basket of elderflowers, with dried elderflowers scattered around.

More than Just Tea


Elderflower benefits and sweet, floral flavor can be enjoyed in other kitchen creations as well. Elderflower can be baked into a cake, made into a cordial, or simmered into a syrup to be used for drinks and topping desserts. Plum Deluxe has made elderflower cocktails and Ciaran's white sangria using dried elderflower.
This multifaceted flower adds summer charm to whatever you make.
If you would also like to work with the berries of the elder, Plum Deluxe carries Just Elderberries, which can be used for tea and getting creative in the kitchen with jam, syrups, or cake. Whichever way you celebrate and make use of the elder tree, you will be gifted with its lovely taste and health benefits.
I write as someone who grows and uses herbs with love; I am not a medical professional. Please consult your physician with any questions before trying a new herbal regimen.

Mary Hadzimichalis

Mary is a creative kitchen and garden witch with a passion for tea. She lives on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland with her husband and three cats. Her baking, creating, gardening, and women's healthcare advocacy can be followed on Instagram.
Back to Article
More from:
Back to Article